Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Lower the Drinking Age to 18 in U.S. says Hunger Games Co-Star

Age to go to war is 18. So, the drinking age should be 18, as well

From CelebrityFix (Australia) "Hunger Games star: US should lower drinking age to 18":
Most of his fans are probably too young to drink, but that doesn't faze 19-year-old Hunger Games star Josh Hutcherson, who told TMZ he wants the US to lower the drinking age from 21 to 18.

J-Hutch thinks that if you can go to war at 18, you should be allowed to drink too, responding to questions about the underage drinking scandal surrounding his co-star Alexander Ludwig. Watch his super-smooth response to the prickly question above.

Ludwig, who plays Cato in the film, is under police investigation after being snapped leaving a bar in Hollywood earlier this week. He is 19, but was let into the over-21s-only bar The Sayers Club.
Editor's note - Your humble editor has seen the largely libertarian-themed Hunger Games, and gives it a full 5 Stars!

14 comments:

jgeleff said...

It's a state's rights issue.

KN@PPSTER said...

jgeleff,

States don't have rights. People do.

jgeleff said...

But Knapp, you DO understand what I mean by "state's rights", don't you?

Ran / SVP said...

States individually and collectively via the Constitution have only powers; Persons, and only persons, have rights.

Yes Jerry, everyone understands what you mean by "state's rights." The problem is, do you?

KN@PPSTER said...

jgeleff,

Yes, I understand what you mean by "states rights."

And for what it's worth, I agree that the federal government should stay the hell out of the issue of drinking age.

Rather than devolve that issue to the states, though, I'd devolve it to parents, guardians and bartenders.

Chuck said...

Ahh. Celebrity. What can't it do? Not understand that the United States has no "drinking age" any more than it has a national noise ordinance, apparently.

The Right Guy said...

Actually, the EPA does regulate noise emissions from motor vehicles.

Ran / SVP said...

"Drinking age" is an oblique reference to purchasing, yes? The age at which one is permitted to purchase a drink for one's self, whether or not one chooses to inhale?

BTW, Casey made a great case on "drinking age" a short while back. I now agree with Casey and Kn@pp: such purchase and consumption judgements for minors are best in the hands of parents, bartenders and one's insurance contract - in other words, beyond State's powers.

Eric Dondero said...

Hey you all. The Swedish Sambo Scandal just got better... Story tomorrow morning here at LR. And you thought it couldn't get any more shocking.

Chuck said...

"Actually, the EPA does regulate noise emissions from motor vehicles."

Then it's a vehicle design restriction and not a noise ordinance, but thanks anyway for the knee jerk contradiction. I owe you one.

hehe

Chuck said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
The Right Guy said...

Actually, police in some jurisdictions use the standard to enforce noise regulations. It's not a design restriction from the manufacture by their own dictum, but federal law. Like anything else, enforcement puts teeth in laws. In some places people are getting tired of loud motorcycles and the police use the law to enforce noise regulations.

Chuck said...

Good. There is nothing more obnoxious than these motorcycle assholes who seem to want to break windows with their damn exhaust.

(Well, except for this maybe.)

KN@PPSTER said...

The United States does have a de facto federal drinking age, or at least used to.

Because it could not be imposed straight down the line through legislation, it was done with purse-string extortion -- states were threatened with loss of pro rata highway maintenance funds unless they raised their drinking age to 21.

The promoter of that policy was that old lefty nanny statist, Ronald Reagan.